May 2014 General

Suggestions and Feedback

Comments on “Suggestions and Feedback”

  1. my primary reason for reading the magazine is to read the class notes - to learn about the lives of people I knew and people I did not know. as the electronic version does not include the class notes, it is pretty much of no use to me. i'll stick with the print version, even if it is not "green" - but perhaps there could be some thought given to making the print version less glossy. it does not really need to be quite so pretty......
    anne grunert '72

  2. I can't figure out how to read it or find the sections I want! It would be much easier if the online version simply followed the print version

  3. Since I already have the paper copy, which is my preferred mode, I didn't bother to go to the web version today, and, to keep my inbox smaller, will delete the email notice. But, reading some of the earliest comments (I'm not sure why you've left fully visible the full thread since 2011), I wonder if only one's own class notes are visible. I do read many different classes' notes so restriction to my own would not be appealing.

  4. The current (December 2014) edition of the Alumnae Bulletin uses an homage to a photo that is widely misinterpreted. More information available at this link http://isobeldebrujah.wordpress.com/2013/09/03/a-moment-in-labor-history-or-stop-calling-that-poster-rosie-the-riveter/ . The relevant selection is posted below.

    "This is not Rosie the Riveter. Nope, sorry. I know that a lot of people think that this is a RR picture. It isn’t. What it is is an anti-union poster from Westinghouse. If you look closely in the bottom right-ish area, you can see the W. That’s the Westinghouse symbol.
    "Pausing again to examine; this is an example of exceptional advertising but it’s not good art. She’s too pretty, too perfect, too clearly chosen not because she tells a story but because she attracts the eye. She’s not an image of strength. She’s a parody of the concept that women can be strong. She’s making a muscle but she doesn’t have definition. She’s got the smooth, prettiness that is required of women, even when those women are being reminded to work hard to win a war and not to form a union in the process."

    I'm frustrated that Bryn Mawr, of all places, has not done the research about this.

  5. Thank heavens the hard copy remains...hard to take computer to bathtub for instance..
    Good to read about new president..

    Cover not appealing...glad to have intelligent comment above.

  6. We recognize that the original of the image we were riffing on was not Rosie the Riveter. That said, it has entered into the popular culture as representing Rosie -- and strong, empowered women. For instance, if you google "Rosie the Riveter," virtually all the images in the first three rows (27 out of 30) that come up are either the Westinghouse poster or a variant thereof:
    https://www.google.com/search?q=rosie+the+riveter&biw=1920&bih=943&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=XgaLVJn8NtPIsATbq4KADQ&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ.

    Our intention was to have a little bit of fun.

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