December 2014 Articles

Anassa Kata

For today’s children, The Colloquia of the Hermeneumata Pseudodositheana might not hold a candle to Harry Potter, but for Eleanor Dickey ’89, M.A. ’89, the title has proven to be pure magic.

Photo courtesy V. Diaz Nunez Ferrero.

Photo courtesy V. Diaz Nunez Ferrero.

One of the West’s oldest surviving children’s books, this ancient text was designed to help Latin speakers learn Greek and Greek speakers learn Latin. Working from medieval manuscripts and fragments of ancient papyri, Dickey has reconstructed the text and translated it into English. With its scenes about shopping, banking, bathing, and dining, the result offers a vivid picture of daily life in the Roman Empire.

In recognition of her standing as a leader in the field of Latin and Greek languages and linguistics, Dickey, a professor at the University of Reading, has been elected as a fellow of the British Academy, the UK’s national body that champions and supports the humanities and social sciences.

For her achievements in alleviating poverty among her countrymen, Verónica Díaz Núñez de Ferrero ’69 was recognized recently by the National Institute for Development and Social Action in Perú.

She started her career in academics as a sociology professor at the Catholic University of Perú but turned her attention to social development in the poorest communities in Perú. At U.S. Agency for International Development Perú, she oversaw development issues for Peruvian women and managed leadership training programs targeted to low-income Peruvians.

Working with former Peruvian first lady Violeta Belaúnde, Díaz Núñez de Ferrero played a key role in the creation of community centers in 25 shantytowns around Lima. The centers provide integrated social services, including basic education, day care for the children of working mothers, technical training for women, and health care.

 

 

Photo of Melanie Cree Green by Tia Brayman

Photo of Melanie Cree Green by Tia Brayman

 

Photo of Cecilia Diniz Behn by Gabriel Diniz.

Photo of Cecilia Diniz Behn by Gabriel Diniz.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soccer teammates at Bryn Mawr, Melanie Cree Green ’99 and Cecilia Diniz Behn ’99 are once again playing on the same team. The pair recently received funding for research to develop a new mathematical model to better understand pre-diabetes in teenage girls.

Green, a pediatric endocrinologist at Children’s Hospital Colorado-University of Colorado, was delighted to read in class notes that Behn had joined the faculty of the Colorado School of Mines.

“I had been looking for someone with expertise in mathematical modeling for about a year before I had contacted Cecilia,” Green says. “I looked her up on the Mines page, and I realized that she may have exactly the expertise that I was looking for.”

Their joint project, titled “Hepatic and Adipose Insulin Resistance in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome,” is being funded by a collaboration between Children’s Hospital Colorado-University of Colorado and the Colorado School of Mines.

 

Photo of Cameron Patridge by Ed Graham courtesy Washington National Cathedral.

Photo of Cameron Patridge by Ed Graham courtesy Washington National Cathedral.

After Cameron Partridge ’95 became the first openly transgender priest to give a sermon at the Washington National Cathedral, The Washington Times gave him a shout-out: “The Rev. Cameron Partridge told the audience at the landmark Episcopal church that people need to be unashamed of who they are and embrace ‘the blessing of collaborating visions.’

“‘We need to see one another, to be revelations to one another, to go out into the world together across our differences,’ Mr. Partridge said, ‘so that we might be able to show one another resources we literally may not be able to see or access on our own.’”

Partridge is the Episcopal chaplain at Boston University and a lecturer and counselor for Episcopal and Anglican students at Harvard Divinity School.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo of Soraya M. Coley courtesy Cal Poly Pomona.

Photo of Soraya M. Coley courtesy Cal Poly Pomona.

The board of trustees of California State University has appointed Soraya M. Coley, M.S.S. ’74, Ph.D. ’81, as the next president of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. When she takes office in 2015, she will be the first woman and the first African American to hold the position.

Coley currently serves as provost and vice president for academic affairs at California State University, Bakersfield, where she also served as interim vice president for university advancement. Earlier in her career, she served as provost and vice president for academic affairs at Alliant International University and as dean of the College of Human Development and Community Service at California State University, Fullerton.

A graduate of Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, she earned her master’s in social planning and social research and Ph.D. in social planning and policy from Bryn Mawr.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo of Soraya M. Coley courtesy Cal Poly Pomona.

Photo courtesy Mansi Gupta.

Mansi Gupta ’10, a computer science and economics major at Bryn Mawr, is transitioning into something wholly different. After earning a master’s degree from New York’s School of Visual Arts, she co-founded TRMTAB, a company that upcycles waste created in traditional leather goods factories to create refined leather goods for tech devices.

The company has officially launched, thanks to a successful Kickstarter campaign that raised just over $25,000. That provided enough to move from prototypes to a limited-edition collection of merchandise, which includes one-of-a-kind sleeves for MacBooks, iPads, iPhones, and various tablets.

TRMTAB’s products are currently being created using waste from Prachi Leathers, located in Kanpur, India, and owned by Gupta’s family. During the Kickstarter campaign, Prachi Leathers also created an education fund for the daughters of employees. For every sleeve sold via Kickstarter, they pledged to donate $5 toward the fund.

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